Posts Tagged ‘ Morality ’

Author Tracks Secular Methods of Meaning, Ethics, Hardship & Death

December 19, 2014
By
Phil Zuckerman

Phil Zuckerman

If you want to find out how non-religious people deal with tragedy, death and suffering, one good method is to simply ask them. This is one approach sociologist Phil Zuckerman uses in his wonderful new book, Living the Secular Life, New Answers to Old Questions. Zuckerman is my guest today, and we discuss this recent publication, which was just released at the beginning of this month. Zuckerman is a professor of sociology and secular studies at Pitzer College in Claremont, California. He is the author of Faith No More: Why People Reject Religion (2011), and Society Without God (2008). In 2011 Zuckerman founded an interdisciplinary Department of Secular Studies at Pitzer College, the first in the nation.  In his new book Zuckerman weaves numerous interviews of secular people into compelling narratives of life, death, morality and meaning. He combines these interesting anecdotes with the latest sociological studies and data to provide a fascinating view of the irreligious in modern society.

MP3 File
(31 minutes, 47 seconds, 15.26 MB)

Read Neuroscientist and Author Sam Harris’ Interview with Zuckerman here | View a picture of a monk with a deceased man in a train station here

Authors Map Robust & Mature Humanist Worldview in New Book

November 7, 2014
By
John Figdor

John Figdor

John Figdor, a co-author of the book, Atheist Mind, Humanist Heart, Rewriting the 10 Commandments for the 21st Century, discusses the merits of a complete and coherent worldview, his views on ethics, and working with his co-author Lex Bayer. Their concise, readable book focuses on epistemology and morality and outlines a complete theory of knowledge and a guide to ethical behavior. Figdor is the Humanist Chaplain at Stanford University. According to The Stanford Review, Figdor is the first Humanist Chaplain serving a university community on the West Coast.

MP3 File
(51 minutes, 09 seconds, 24.56 MB)

Enter the Rethink Prize on the Atheist Mind Humanist Heart website here | Read about Figdor in The Stanford Review here | Listen to my previous podcast with Philosopher Stephen Law here

The Odds of an Evil God & The Truth of Moral Questions

January 15, 2013
By

Stephen Law

Stephen Law

Stephen Law Discusses His Interesting Thoughts on Morality, His “Evil God Hypothesis,” and His Views on Religion

Philosopher Stephen Law challenges theists to explain, “. . . why the hypothesis that there exists an omnipotent, omniscient and all-good god should be considered significantly more reasonable than the hypothesis that there exists an omnipotent, omniscient and all-evil god. Theists typically dismiss the evil god hypothesis out of hand because of the problem of good – there is surely too much good in the world for it to be the creation of such a being. But then why doesn’t the problem of evil provide equally good grounds for dismissing belief in a good god?” Law is the editor of the Royal Institute of Philosophy journal THINK. He has published several books and is senior lecturer in philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London. His books include Believing Bullshit, The Philosophy Gym, Humanism, A Very Short Introduction, and The War for Children’s Minds. During our conversation, Law shares his interesting views on morality, discusses how science relates to morality, and challenges both theists and non-theists to think.

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(42 minutes, 17 seconds, 20.3 MB)

Timeless Questions, Ancient Philosophers, Modern Strategies

December 3, 2012
By

Massimo Pigliucci

Massimo Pigliucci

Philosopher Massimo Pigliucci Combines Science and Philosophy While Discussing the Meaning of Life

Most people consign the discovery of facts about our universe to science, and the navigation of values and meaning to the domain of religion. Massimo Pigliucci, a professor of philosophy at the City University of New York, has a better idea: Combine science and philosophy to explore the subjects that give our life meaning, such as love, friendship, morality and justice. This approach is the subject of his new book, Answers for Aristotle, How Science and Philosophy Can Lead us to a More Meaningful Life. In this podcast Pigliucci and I discuss his book, and how he views scientific research through the lens of philosophy to provide a strategy to live the best life possible.

MP3 File
(38 minutes, 44 seconds, 18.6 MB)
Pigliucci publishes his own podcast titled Rationally Speaking. You can listen to it here. His blog of the same name can be found here. His web page, which includes more links and information about him, can be found here.


Writer Nicholas Kristof Panders to Religion in NYT Column

April 11, 2012
By

In a painfully acquiescent article for The New York Times, columnist Nicholas Kristof heralds the recent direction of discourse from atheist writers as nigh “reverential” to religion. He cites three recent books, one from Alain de Botton titled Religion for Atheists, Edward O. Wilson’s new book, The Social Conquest of Earth,…

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Book Review: The Moral Landscape

September 20, 2011
By
Book Review: The Moral Landscape

In his book The Moral Landscape, published in 2010, author Sam Harris challenged the long-held belief that relegates science to answering questions about the physical universe, and religion to concerns of meaning, values and morality. Harris claims that this separation is false and asserts the supremacy of science as a…

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Robert Fulghum, Kindergarten, and Morality

September 4, 2011
By
Robert Fulghum, Kindergarten, and Morality

During dinner a few weeks ago, a friend of mine mentioned Robert Fulghum. We were discussing morality, and Fulghum’s name came up in the context of his popular poem, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, published in 1988. Fulghum served as a Unitarian parish minister in…

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